Our Impact

SLV Response Fund

In 2020, during the global pandemic, CFSLV's rapid response provided relief funds to nonprofits in the San Luis Valley. In partnership with the First Southwest Community Fund, we were able to help local nonprofits in their efforts to serve the most vulnerable communities affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

San Luis Valley nonprofits have been hit hard by the pandemic. From needing to lay off staff to seeing an increase in demand for services, our nonprofits have been on the front lines. We are proud to be able to support them.

Thank you to our other supporters of the SLV Response Fund, including the Anderson Family Foundation and the Kind Foundation.

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The SLV Response Fund provided funds to the San Luis Valley Immigrant Resource Center that covered rent, utilities and food assistance to immigrant families. Since March 2020, many SLV communities have experienced the effects of COVID-19 with outbreaks happening at several places of employment, including the Alamosa mushroom farm and several potato warehouses where many workers were forced to quarantine.

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Community Resources & Housing Development used the SLV Response Fund to establish a program to provide financial assistance for low to moderate income households that were impacted by COVID-19. The eligibility process was kept simple. Funds were disbursed within a few days of application, and used to meet basic needs such as food, housing, utilities, and healthcare.

SLV Response Fund Recipients

ANTONITO TOGETHER - Antonito Together helped homebound seniors who were no longer able to get meals from the senior center, which had closed due to the pandemic. Working with the Meals on Wheels Coordinator, the team decided to supplement the program by providing restaurant-prepared lunches on Saturdays (when the program did not provide meals). By taking this action, they supported the two restaurants in town, as well as provided seniors with good, hot meal.

www.antonitotogether.org

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF THE SAN LUIS VALLEY - The organization provided essential childcare to 64 families who didn't have other options in terms of finding places for their children to go after school. BGCSLV provided daily meals to all of the 186 members, as well as over 200 family meal kits to those most affected by the pandemic.

www.bgcslv.org

COMMUNITY RESOURCES & HOUSING DEVELOPMENT - CRHDC established a program to provide financial assistance for low to moderate income households that were impacted by COVID-19. The eligibility process was kept simple, and funds were disbursed within a few days of application, and used to meet basic needs such as food, housing, utilities, and healthcare.

www.crhdc.org

CREEDE EARLY LEARNING CENTER - The Center used the funds to cover childcare costs for families that qualify for tuition assistance. Twenty-six children from 21 different families received an 80% or more discount on childcare costs for June and July, and a 50% or more discount on childcare costs for August.

www.creedeearlylearningcenter.com

LA PUENTE - Funding enabled La Puente to expand their services in a safe manner and still provide for those in need of food. Their team reached out to several local restaurant owners, inviting them to share in the support of buying their food to help those in need.

www.lapuentehome.org

NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS - The organization used the grant to pay for firewood. Firewood has been one of the top requests and difficult for people to by when the lost their jobs or became unemployed due to COVID-19. The organization delivered many loads of firewood.

www.nhncrestone.com

RIO GRANDE HOSPITAL & CLINICS - As a critical access hospital with unplanned funds going to personal protective equipment and the community at the beginning of the fight against the Coronavirus pandemic, the grant enabled RGHC to purchase a telehealth system. The new telehealth system helps patients meet virtually with their medical provider safely from their own homes and will continue to deliver safe care for people in the San Luis Valley.

www.rghc.org

SAN LUIS VALLEY ANIMAL WELFARE SOCIETY - Because of the pandemic, dogs were being abandoned and many were being surrendered because owners could not afford to feed them. The shelter filled to capacity with rescued homeless dogs that had to be fed, cared for, and many required veterinary care and vaccines. The organization used SLV Response Funds to cover the veterinary costs incurred because of the virus disruption in the SLV.

www.slvaws.org

SAN LUIS VALLEY IMMIGRANT RESOURCE CENTER - The grant was used to provide rent, utility, and food assistance to immigrant families in the San Luis Valley. Since March 2020, many San Luis Valley communities have experienced the effects of COVID-19. Outbreaks have occurred at several places of employment, including the Alamosa mushroom farm and several potato warehouses.

www.slvirc.org

SAN LUIS VALLEY LOCAL FOODS COALITION - As a result of the pandemic, the Valley Roots Food Hub pivoted from mostly wholesale buyers to mostly individual and family buyers, which increased costs for staff, fuel, trucks and coordination due to home deliveries. The Rio Grande Farm Park's produce was in high demand this season, and they were able to donate $24,000 worth of produce to four local food pantry partners.

www.slvlocalfoods.org

SOUTH CENTRAL COLORADO SENIORS - The funding was used to serve residents in need of food as well as essentials to an area consisting of many unable to meet their needs, especially during this time of isolation. SCCS was able to provide 70, 14-day, shelf-stable food boxes to older adults living alone, or families with older adults living within their households.